Southern Musings

Makarora Braided River – an under estimated biodiversity hotspot

wrybill chick

Ecologist, Rachel Hufton reports on her local braided river at Makarora. An iconic habitat unique to New Zealand encompassing an array of wildlife found nowhere else in the world. From the headwaters of the Makarora on the eastern flanks of the Southern Alps near the Haast Pass in Mt Aspiring National Park. The Makarora River…

Kaki /Black Stilt release of 60 birds this week in the Tasman River Valley near Mt Cook National Park this week

The kakī, or black stilt, is an endemic native wading bird found only in New Zealand, and it is regarded by the Māori as a living treasure – a taonga species. The population in 2017 is 106 wild adult birds, so the release represents a significant increase in numbers – lets hope stoats and cats…

Videos of last year’s Sustainable Summits Conference, at Mt Cook

Mt Cook Aoraki

Last winter I attended the inaugural, for NZ, Sustainable Summits Conference, at Mt Cook Aoraki Village and did several posts on same. It was one of the most interesting multi-day events I’ve ever attended. For it’s duration my friend Carla Braun-Elwert filmmaker editor artist, made videos, and she has now published them as below. Click…

A year in the life of the Matukituki Charitable Trust operating in Mt Aspiring National Park

NZ falcon becoming airborne

The Matukituki Charitable Trust which operates in Mt Aspiring National Park has just released a newsletter which is reproduced below, [unless otherwise indicated photos and italicised text are by Donald Lousley who btw is proud to have been involved trapping, monitoring and making photos towards assisting with the great results as outlined below]: Kia Ora…

How best to look after our precious New Zealand waterways – a personal view by Laurel Teirney of Wanaka

A personal view by by Laurel Teirney, a former manager at Ministry of Fisheries The success of the community based/scientist/agency approach we adopted for looking after the whole of the Fiordland, and then the Kaikoura Marine Areas makes me feel we’ve struck on a “magic” formula that just might apply to our lakes and rivers…